Plan Your Fall Foliage Trip!

Happy summer from the Oregon Fall Foliage team! Believe it or not, now is the time to start planning fall foliage trips. There are so many ways and places to see beautiful colors across Oregon!

Cyclists on the Covered Bridges Scenic Bikeway in Cottage Grove

Cyclists on the Covered Bridges Scenic Bikeway in Cottage Grove

We don’t always know WHEN the leaves will be at their brightest. Mother Nature keeps that insider info to herself. However, we’ve been following leaf patterns for 10 years now, so we have a good idea of where they start and when they go.

Drake Park and Mirror Pond (courtesy: Manasi Seth)

Drake Park and Mirror Pond (courtesy: Manasi Seth)

But that’s not the only reason we’re here. We also have awesome ideas of the best ways to experience the entire fall season. We’ll tell you the best fall drives, the best fall hikes, where to find the best fall flavors at Oregon restaurants and new trip ideas that you’ve likely never heard of. Plus, we’ll post amazing deals on lodging, adventures and dining.

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Share your pictures with us by tagging them #ORFallFoliage. We’ll pick the best to use (with credit, of course) for our Fall Photos of the Day. Send us your favorite leaf pics from past years to get excited for Oregon Fall Foliage 2013.

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7 thoughts on “Plan Your Fall Foliage Trip!

  1. Hi, I’d like to do a family photo shoot this fall. When is the best time to take advantage of the color in the Portland Metro area? Thanks.

  2. Hi Kristin – Thanks for writing! From our experience, your best bet is the last week of October or early November. That tends to be when the maples, ash, larch and dogwood are at their peak around Hoyt Arboretum.

  3. My wife and I have planned a trip to Portland and Willamette Valley from October 12 – October 15th (going to Napa from October 16-19th. Are we going to be too early to see good color? I know 1-2 weeks later would probably be better.

  4. Hi Seth,
    Historically, mid-October is a little early for fall foliage in Portland and the Willamette Valley. However, you may be in luck this year. We’ve had a fairly dry and hot summer, so the leaves might start changing earlier this year. One winemaker we talked to said she’s preparing for a late-September crush, two weeks earlier than usual. Have a great trip!

  5. We arrive in Portland October 19th and plan to start by heading east in the hopes of taking in and photographing some of the fall foliage and water falls of Oregon. Looking online, we tentatively plan to start with Latourell Falls, then Toketee Falls and on to Punchbowl and Matlako Falls prior to stopping in Crater Lake. It is not easy to tell if this is the best route for the fall foliage as well. Since this is the primary purpose of our visit, we do not want the trips to the falls to overshadow the best route for the foliage. Ant better suggestions?

  6. If you like waterfalls and fall foliage, Highway 58 is another great option from Portland to Crater Lake. Near Oakridge, Oregon’s second highest waterfall, Salt Creek Falls, is easily accessible year-round. The Salt Creek Falls-Diamond Creek Falls Trail is a 3.2 mile loop through stunning fall foliage. You could drive out to Crater Lake along Highway 138 to see great fall colors amazing waterfalls and come back on 58, stopping by Salt Creek and Diamond Creek Falls. To get to Highway 58 from Crater Lake, take 138 east to Highway 97. Head north and follow the signs to 58. Note: check with TripCheck.com before using 58. The Salt Creek Tunnel is closed weeknights from 8 p.m.- 6 a.m. for road repairs.

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